Oklahoma City, OK

Top Activities

National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum: Featuring one of the most comprehensive collections of Western art in the world, the museum depicts the rugged spirit and rich influences of cowboy culture.

Oklahoma City National Memorial & Museum: This memorial pays tribute to those who were killed, those who survived and those changed forever by the April 19, 1995 bombing of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in downtown Oklahoma City.

Bricktown Entertainment District:  Oklahoma City’s hottest entertainment and dining district. Enjoy a stroll along the mile-long Bricktown Canal or take a cruise on a Bricktown Water Taxi and enjoy an entertaining narrated tour of the district.

Oklahoma History Center:  Home to more than 2,000 artifacts that tell the stories of Oklahoma and its people, the center features a new special exhibit each year.

The Outlet Shoppes at Oklahoma City:  The Outlet Shoppes at Oklahoma City is Oklahoma City’s newest shopping destination. Save 25- 60% in 85 well-known designer outlets including, Saks Fifth Avenue OFF 5TH, Nike, Coach, Brooks Brothers, Guess, Chico’s, Banana Republic, DKNY, J. Crew, Gap, Michael Kors, Tommy Hilfiger, Under Armour, Levi’s and Carters.

 

Ideas for First Time Visitors:

  • National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum
  • Red Earth Festival
  • Oklahoma History Center
  • Myriad Botanical Gardens
  • Oklahoma City Museum of Art
  • Oklahoma City National Memorial and Museum

Ideas for Repeat Visitors:

  • American Banjo Museum
  • Museum of Osteology
  • Oklahoma City Zoo
  • Science Museum Oklahoma
  • Overholser Mansion

Special Events

“The Unsettled Lens” and “After the Floating World” at OKCMOA

“The Unsettled Lens: Photography from the Permanent Collection” and “After the Floating World: The Enduring Art of Japanese Woodblock Prints” will open Feb. 18 on the first floor of the Oklahoma City Museum of Art. These two new, original exhibitions feature artwork from the Museum’s permanent collection and many works that have not been on view at the Museum before.

“With over 4,000 works in our care, we are limited in our ability to share the permanent collection,” said E. Michael Whittington, President and CEO. “Special exhibitions like these give us not only an opportunity to showcase these works of art, but to provide new scholarship. ‘After the Floating World’ includes two remarkable, early 20th century artists whose work was thoroughly grounded in the Japanese tradition, yet open to the dynamic influences of Impressionism and modern art.”

Woodblock prints, popular in Japan from the 17th through the 19th centuries, are known as “ukiyo-e,” which translates as “pictures from the floating world.” “Ukiyo-e” artists produced prints in a variety of subject matter including actors in the Kabuki theater, folktales, mythology and landscapes.

“After the Floating World” focuses on two printmakers: Torii Kiyotada VII (1875-1941) and Hiroshi Yoshida (1876-1950). They were at the forefront of the early 20th century evolution of the “ukiyo-e” tradition into a style known as “shin hanga” that incorporated stylistic elements from the West. Kiyotada VII was born into a family with a long tradition of producing theatrical images, and his prints of Kabuki actors illustrate the rich tradition of Japanese theater. Yoshida was a popular artist in both Japan and the United States whose extensive world travels resulted in evocative prints of familiar landmarks such as Mt. Fuji, the Taj Mahal, the Acropolis and Niagara Falls.


A Yard of Turkey Red: The Western Bandana

A rare collection of period bandannas provides Museum visitors a glimpse of authentic neckwear once sought after by young horsemen on the range and later popularized in Western fiction. Many a 19-century cowboy bought a square yard of Turkey red cloth at the local mercantile and proudly tied it around his neck. The name “bandanna” came from the Turkish process of dying cotton fabric with the root of the rubia plant to produce a bright red material. The exhibition includes history about the practical use of these neckcloths, its place as a fashion element within the cowboy wardrobe, the history of Turkey red fabric, and the choice of silk versus cotton. This exhibition is organized by the National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum.


After the Floating World: The Enduring Art of Japanese Woodblock Prints

Images carved onto wooden blocks used to create colorful prints on paper are among the most famous Japanese art forms. These prints, popular in Japan from the 17th through the 19th centuries, are known as “Ukiyo-e,” which translates as “pictures from the floating world.” “Ukiyo-e” artists produced prints in a variety of subject matter including actors in the Kabuki theater, female portraiture, folktales and mythology and landscapes.

Organized from the collections of the Oklahoma City Museum of Art, this exhibition focuses on two artists: Torii Kiyotada VII (1875-1941) and Hiroshi Yoshida (1876-1950). These printmakers were at the forefront of the early 20th century evolution of the “Ukiyo-e” tradition into a style known as “Shin Hanga” that incorporated stylistic elements from the West. Kiyotada VII was born into a family with a long tradition of producing theatrical images, and his prints of Kabuki actors illustrate the rich tradition of Japanese theater. Yoshida (1876-1950) was a popular artist both in Japan and in the United States whose extensive world travels resulted in evocative prints of familiar landmarks such as Mt. Fuji, the Taj Mahal, the Acropolis and Niagara Falls.

Local Transportation

Red Carpet Tours: We provide local and national chart bus service for groups of all sizes.


Kincaid of Oklahoma: Kincaid Coach Lines, Inc. is a family-owned charter motor coach business, providing exceptional service since 1977. From a modest beginning operating four very old coaches in and around Kansas City area, Kincaid has grown to become one of the largest motor coach and tour operators in the Midwest.


Village Tours:  A modern fleet of 48 motorcoaches stand ready to take groups of every size to the destination of their choice. Coaches range in size from 11 to 56 passengers.


Distance from Major Airports

  • Will Rogers World Airport (to downtown) – 10 miles

Local Tour Guides

Judith Hilbun: joyfuljudith@gmail.com Specializes in Downtown, Bricktown, Oklahoma History & Oklahoma City.


Brian Ferrell, Factor 110: brian@factor110.com Service groups of all types – from step-by-step planning of activities and tours, including walking, limo and coach tours.


Janet Raines, Kincaid Coach: jraines@kincaidcoach.com Complete travel services for groups or individuals with assistance or expert travel planners.


Carol Jordan, Territorial Tours Limited: territorialltd@att.net Guided tours, sightseeing, groups.